Tag: npr

06/11

How to Measure NPR’s Success in a Digital Age

Is NPR’s performance on the digital front a sign that radio’s digital evolution has stalled? Or, worse, that it’s just a big hairy mistake? So says would-be town crier Richard Harker. Harker’s basic point is right on: Broadcasters should direct some of their innovative attention towards content on traditional radio channels and not only experiment with all things digital. I agree! But saying innovative effort should be spread around is different from saying initiatives on the digital front are a waste. Yet that’s what Harker seems to say with the example of NPR, where he steps into … [Read more...]

03/27

Radio’s Missing Marketing Funnel

One of the great things about non-commercial radio is that it’s supported largely by fans – the very “public” embodied in the term “public service.” And this is as true of NPR-type stations as it is for non-commercial Christian stations. And these stations have something else in common besides their business model: They both tend to lack a marketing funnel. What is a marketing funnel? It’s the process whereby consumers move from awareness and sampling of your station at the wide top to fan-ship and, in the case of public and non-commercial stations, financial support at the narrow … [Read more...]

08/26

Is Radio Serious about the Internet?

I'm not so sure. And I'm not talking about streaming here. It's already clear that radio is not necessarily serious about that, or we wouldn't suffer endless debates about whether or not we should create a business model native to the Internet that leverages all the wonderful advantages of technology to offer up targeting and dimensionality and accountability to clients who desire it and consumers who appreciate it. Yes, we should do all that. No, we should not simply aspire to simulcast our streams with our over-the-air product so as to increase our odds of winning what Arbitron … [Read more...]

11/16

News/Talking about the Wrong Things

Republican soul-searching followed the demographic slam to the gut from younger voters, African Americans, and Hispanics in the election earlier this month. And the reverberations from that punch have resonated through the ranks of News/Talk programmers and talent nationwide. While I can’t be specific about the research I have done in that area (it’s both extensive and proprietary), I can tell you this much: It should come as no great surprise. Interest in Talk per se – as expressed in the form of Conservative Political Talk – is only a small fraction of the overall interest in the … [Read more...]

04/09

NPR’s New Ability to Power Streaming Monetization

NPR's recent deal with Triton Digital is more than a means of measuring webcast metrics.  It's also an important step in the direction of monetizing NPR's streaming content and sharing that revenue potential and that power with affiliate stations. Listen as I talk with Jay Sterin, Triton's VP Digital, about what the new capabilities of NPR's streaming assets will mean to the the network and its affiliates alike: [iframe http://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F42158391&show_artwork=true 500 166] Alternate … [Read more...]

01/27

The Upside-Down World of Public Radio Funding

Once upon a time "NPR" stood for "National Public Radio," and the "radio" in NPR was the exclusive means of distributing the network's content. This was an era when stations would solicit funds from listeners to support this and other programming and send a big chunk of those funds back to the network. That was then, this is now. Today, radio is not the distribution channel for NPR content, it is simply another distribution channel for that content (albeit the most important one).  Yet the funding equation works precisely the same way, and that's confounding. Because when radio … [Read more...]

05/25

Just how “Social” is Public Radio?

Let's suppose you provided a very specific product - unique to the world.  Let's suppose the demand for that product was enormous, so much so that many consumers of it do what most radio listeners would never do:  They actually pay for it.  Suppose the consumers for this product have enormous trust in the brand, a vast sense of "us" - a sense that we who consume this product are similar to each other in important ways and different from others who are apart from our community.  Let's suppose the relationship to this brand is so strong that many consumers choose to do the unthinkable:  They … [Read more...]

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