Tag: guy kawasaki

03/08

Guy Kawasaki knows how to make Radio Enchanting

Guy Kawasaki is one of the most widely read and respected voices on the digital frontier.  He’s an entrepreneur, marketing guru, one-time Apple chief evangelist, and author of ten books (most of which I have read), including his newest, Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions. Watch the video of our conversation here.  An abbreviated transcript is below, but the video is richer and funnier, too. [iframe http://player.vimeo.com/video/20749224?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0 500 281] Prefer audio?  Try … [Read more...]

01/04

The End of Radio’s Zero-Sum Game

Years ago, I invited author and technology guru Guy Kawasaki to speak before a group of broadcasters.  The heart of his message was this question: Why does radio focus on a zero-sum game, the idea that for me to win my competitor must lose, and vice versa? The answer, of course, is that ratings themselves are a zero-sum game. There are 100 shares to go around, and the only way for me to get some is if you don't.  And revenue is tied directly to ratings, so there are only 100 shares of revenue linked to 100 shares of ratings.  It's one big pie with only so many slices. At least that's how … [Read more...]

09/09

Meaning Makes Money

"Make money by making meaning." And the converse applies, too:  Make no meaning and you won't make money. So says Guy Kawasaki in this video from Stanford. It's not a new video, but somehow the message is evergreen. A lesson just for start-ups? I don't think so. … [Read more...]

06/25

The questionable value of a “No Repeat Tweet”

It turns out that a good Tweet, like a good song, demands repetition. So said Guy Kawasaki at the recent Radio Ink Convergence conference.  Guy schedules Tweets to run up to four times.  It's not spam, he argues, when these folks are following you willingly.  And running them at different times on different days maximizes the chance that the message reaches somebody new and minimizes the potential for annoyance. Now comes this supporting evidence: Mark Suster at Cloud Ave. weighs in with his experiments in timing Tweets - specifically on the question of how many times is … [Read more...]

* = required field

Dive Into The Blog