Tag: consumers

02/27

Radio asks the Wrong Questions

"What's the future of radio?" "How does radio compete against Pandora et. al.?" "How can we get FM on mobile devices?" "How do we stay in a prominent place on the car dashboard?" These are typical of the questions I hear. And what makes them all similar is that they are asked from the inside-out. That is, the implicit assumption is that radio's past must be sustained into the future, and with a few tweaks here and there we can dial up our relevance (pun intended) and dial down our risk. This is equivalent to the consumer products company that asks "how can we make a new product … [Read more...]

12/07

Radio, It Begins with a Problem…

Why does any consumer behave in the way that she does? It's because she has a problem and she wants a solution.  And the more effective, convenient, and simple that solution is, the more she will gravitate towards it. A "problem" doesn't necessarily mean some vexing dilemma.  It could be as simple as the desire to hear a familiar voice on the way to work. The great thing about technology is that it creatively enables a whole host of problems to be solved in clever and powerful ways. Take something as simple as Netflix.  Want a huge selection of movies on-demand without having to … [Read more...]

10/03

Consumers Don’t Care about your Messages

There's a difference between giving people what they desire and messaging them to convince them that what you have is what they desire. That's one point from my friend, branding authority Tom Asacker, in the conversation we had on the stage of the recent Public Radio Program Director's conference in Las Vegas. Watch (or click on the post title if there's no video image): [iframe http://player.vimeo.com/video/50699714?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0 500 281] Prefer audio?  Try this: [audio:http://blip.tv/file/get/Markramsey-ConsumersDontCareAboutYourMessage100.mp3] Download … [Read more...]

04/24

Do you Talk to your Listeners?

"Will you talk to me?" I mean, one-on-one? It's my observation that most program directors spend infinitely more time talking to the ratings reports than talking to actual listeners.  Needless to say, this confuses input (listeners) and outcome (ratings). As a practitioner of consumer research, I'm not foolish enough to believe that one conversation with one listener represents a fact, but it does represent a story.  And the sum total of all listener behavior is the sum total of those stories.  So if you don't start asking for stories, you'll never understand why people do what they … [Read more...]

11/16

An FM Chip in a Mobile Phone isn’t “Me”

Will FM radio ever end up pre-installed in mobile phones in the US? I doubt it, because consumers aren't asking for radio to be built into their mobile phones (and here's a full overview of the issue). But what's more interesting to me is that radio industry leaders keep driving for this, obsessively wishing and hoping and planning for it. Why is that more interesting to me?  Because it's not only deaf to what consumers are asking for, it's blind to the direction of consumer trends. Consider these facts: Major broadcasters are pushing a strategy to implant FM chips in mobile … [Read more...]

07/07

Radio’s Competitive Advantage in a Digital World: It’s the Megaphone

This is a segment from my presentation at the recent Radio Ink Convergence conference.In this portion, I highlight the key way in which radio has an advantage vis-a-vis its competitors.If you really want to understand where radio can be headed - watch this. The value of radio's "megaphone" isn't simply in pimping the airwaves to reach faceless ears.The value is in connecting consumers with our clients by rallying the attention we so uniquely enjoy no matter where those connections are made.But make no mistake:  Our future is not about messaging, it's about … [Read more...]

05/21

Is the Radio “Industry” Dead?

Everybody wants to know what's next for radio, and the answer is...More than one radio "industry."There will be the folks who see the world through the lens of 1999.  These are the people who see nothing but Arbitron's 100-share world in all its tenuous splendor.  All good things will come in over-the-air buys to this crowd.  These are the traditionalists.  The folks who drive with a great view out the rear view mirror.There will be the broadcasters who see digital as non-traditional revenue and are content (relatively speaking) to deliver two to six … [Read more...]

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