05/15

Radio Sellers and Programmers are finally on the Same Side

Value to clients is about more than running ads.  And value to consumers is about more than simply playing music.

That’s the new world of radio today.

No longer is there a “sales side” or a “programming side.”  Nowadays there’s only one “side” and it’s the “value side.”

Value to clients and consumers at the very same time – mediated by your brand.

In the digital space, its all about value – not about interruptive ads stuck in the middle of valued content. In many ways, the client’s content IS the valued content. Watch this brief overview of the “value side” and why it’s the only side any of us should be on.

The video is part of a live Q&A with Federated Media managers hosted by Federated’s James Derby (thanks to Federated and to James for a great conversation).

Watch:

Prefer audio?  Try this:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Download mp3

(You can subscribe to all the MRM video and audio via iTunes and get the goodies before everybody else.  You can also get advance notice of this content if you “like” MRM on Facebook or follow me on Twitter).

* = required field
  • Anonymous

    Good stuff – best quote: “When you create a piece of content, the value of that
    content is zero unless that content appeals to an audience but the value of
    that content is also zero unless that content appeals to clients – to
    advertisers.” 

    There are now three people at the table and hopefully none have their arms folded; the programmer, the sales guy and the digital guy and not necessarily in that order.
    Thanks!

  • Anonymous

    Good stuff – best quote: “When you create a piece of content, the value of that
    content is zero unless that content appeals to an audience but the value of
    that content is also zero unless that content appeals to clients – to
    advertisers.” 

    There are now three people at the table and hopefully none have their arms folded; the programmer, the sales guy and the digital guy and not necessarily in that order.
    Thanks!

  • http://www.markramseymedia.com Mark Ramsey

    And there is far more crossover between them than ever before.

    This is why radio needs “brand managers” – people who have overarching responsibility for the brands. In most companies these people are responsible for sales AND marketing.

  • http://www.markramseymedia.com Mark Ramsey

    The beauty of anything digital is that metrics tell the story, and those metrics are available to you.
    It’s not just about the responsive portion of the audience, it’s also about the raw number of uniques you are attracting to each effort.
    That said, you will need to test out ideas to see what spikes interest. If you depend only on the tried and true you’ll see interest in streaming, in contests, and in nothing else.

  • john ford

    Hmmm. Here’s something to chew on from that guy everyone loves to quote. From the Walter Isacsson Bio, our avatar Steve Jobs on why industries fail: 

    “The company does a great job, innovates and becomes a monopoly or close to it in some field, and then the quality of the product becomes less important. The company starts valuing the great salesman, because they’re the ones who can move the needle on revenues.” So salesmen are put in charge, and product engineers and designers feel demoted: Their efforts are no longer at the white-hot center of the company’s daily life. They “turn off.” IBM [IBM] and Xerox [XRX], Jobs said, faltered in precisely this way. The salesmen who led the companies were smart and eloquent, but “they didn’t know anything about the product.” In the end this can doom a great company, because what consumers want is good products.”

    I might even pontificate that if the salesmen and programmers/talent are on the same page, something might be very, very wrong in the state of Denmark. 

  • http://www.markramseymedia.com Mark Ramsey

    The analogy doesn’t work, I think. Apple first of all is Apple. Second, Apple has ONLY customers, not clients. Radio has two distinct customer constituencies. Looking out for the interests of both based on what works for both is true to the spirit of Steve Jobs.
    Mark Ramsey

  • Dave Warawa – PROSALESGUY

    The polarity exists because the industry set itself up that way decades ago by saying they were either sales generated or programming based. Here’s what radio is all about – MAKING MONEY. Wait before you clench your teeth. That’s the goal of any business. The more money you make the more stable the station is, the more job security every one has, the better the working environment and morale experienced.

    The GMs job is not to break up fights between Programming and Sales, it’s to ensure they DON’T HAPPEN. Sales will not want to sell something that is thought to be bad programming no matter what the rate, and Programming will not leave sales and revenue generation up to the Sales Department, concentrating on throwing roadblocks toward any sales generated ideas and content. The GM needs to feel this way to the core and hire leaders as managers that have the same philosophy.

    Now we’re talking a business model that attracts high calibre people and retains them.

  • http://www.markramseymedia.com Mark Ramsey

    All true, but those points could have been made a decade ago with equal force, Dave.
    I think my point isn’t to exaggerate the friction (although I may have inadvertently done so) but rather to illustrate the new reality of a system which aligns the incentives of all towards greater appeal to advertisers and consumers alike since consumers “click” on only what they like, so the advertiser must have stuff worth “clicking” and not simply interrupt what consumers like.
    Sorry for the long sentence.